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What I Eat Hungry Planet
Man Eating Bugs
Material World Robo Sapiens
Women in the Material World
    Today we are witnessing the greatest change in global diets since the invention of agriculture. Globalization, mass tourism, and giant agribusiness have filled American supermarket shelves with extraordinary new foods and McDonald's, Kentucky Fried Chicken, and Kraft Cheese Singles are being exported to every corner of the planet.
Best Book of the Year, 2006
James Beard Foundation
"The world's kitchens open to Peter Menzel and Faith D'Aluisio... As always with this couple's terse, lively travelogues, politics and the world economy are never far from view."

-New York Times
"While the photos are extraordinary-fine enough for a stand-alone volume-it's the questions these photos ask that make this so gripping. This is a beautiful, quietly provocative volume."

-Publisher’s Weekly

You can buy this book at your independent bookstore, at Amazon.com, or at Powells.com.

Go to Social Studies School Services for Hungry Planet poster sets and curriculum guides with PowerPoint presentations.
30 Families, 24 Countries, 600 Meals
One Extraordinary Book
    In Hungry Planet, Peter Menzel and Faith D'Aluisio present a photographic study of families from around the world, revealing what people eat during the course of one week. Each family's profile includes a detailed description of their weekly food purchases; photographs of the family at home, at market, and in their community; and a portrait of the entire family surrounded by a week's worth of groceries.

    To assemble this remarkable comparison, Menzel and D'Aluisio traveled to twenty-four countries and visited thirty families from Bhutan and Bosnia to Mexico and Mongolia. Accompanied by an insightful foreword by Marion Nestle, and provocative essays from Alfred W. Crosby, Francine R. Kaufman, Corby Kummer, Charles C. Mann, Michael Pollan, and Carl Safina, the result of this journey is a 30-course documentary feast: captivating, infuriating, and altogether fascinating.


©Peter Menzel Photography